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Laura Gonnerman

Associate Professor

laura [dot] gonnerman [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Email)

Language and Cognitive Neuroscience Lab

Education

BA German, Boston University
MA French, Middlebury College
MA German, Middlebury College
MA Linguistics University of Southern California
PhD Linguistics, University of Southern California

Research interests

My two main areas of interest are: 1) the structure of the lexical semantic system; and 2) the representation and processing of morphologically complex words in English and other languages. To explore these areas, I use a combination of research in normal adult processing, language loss in Alzheimer's disease and other disorders, connectionist modeling, and imaging.

Recent publications

Gonnerman, L.M., Seidenberg, M.S., & Andersen, E.S. (2007). Graded semantic and phonological similarity effects in priming: Evidence for a distributed connectionist approach to morphology. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 136, 323-345.

Gonnerman, L.M., (2007) Children’s recognition of novel derived words. In Caunt-Nulton, H., Kulatilake, S., & Woo, I. (Eds.) BUCLD 31: Proceedings of the 31st annual Boston University Conference on Language Development, (p. 251-261). Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.

Aronoff, J.M., Gonnerman, L.M., Almor, A., Kempler, D., & Andersen, E.S. . (2006). Information content versus relational knowledge: Semantic deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Neuropsychologia. 44, 21-35

Devlin, J.T., Jamison, H.L., Gonnerman, L.M., & Matthews, P.M. (2006). The role of the posterior fusiform gyrus in reading. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 18 (6), 911-922.

Devlin, J.T., Jamison, H.L., Matthews, P.M., & Gonnerman, L.M. (2004). Morphology and the internal structure of words. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 101, (41), 14984-14988.

Gonnerman, L.M., & Andersen, E.S. (2002). Graded semantic and phonological similarity effects in morphologically complex words. In S. Bendjaballah, W.U. Dressler, O.E. Pfeiffer, & M.D. Voeikova (Eds.) Morphology 2000. (pp. 137-148). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Plaut, D.C., & Gonnerman, L.M. (2000). Are non-semantic morphological effects incompatible with a distributed connectionist approach to lexical processing? Language and Cognitive Processes, 15, 445-485.

Seidenberg, M.S., & Gonnerman, L.M. (2000). Explaining derivational morphololy as the convergence of codes. Trends in cognitive Sciences, 4, 353-361.

Devlin, J.T., Gonnerman, L.M., Andersen, E.S. & Seidenberg, M.S. (2000). Category specific semantic deficits in focal and widespread brain damage: A computational account. In G. Cohen, R. Johnston, & K. Plunkett (Eds.), Exploring Cognition: Damaged Brains and Neural Networks, (pp. 97-128). East Sussex: Psychology Press.

Andersen, E.S., Brizuela, M., DuPuy, B., & Gonnerman, L.M. (1999). Cross- linguistic evidence for the early acquisition of discourse markers as register variables. Journal of Pragmatics, 31, 1339-1351.

Devlin, J.T., Gonnerman, L.M., Andersen, E.S. & Seidenberg, M.S. (1998). Category specific semantic deficits in focal and widespread brain damage: A computational account. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 10, 77-94.

Gonnerman, L.M., Andersen, E.S., Devlin, J.T., Kempler, D., & Seidenberg, M.S. (1997). Double dissociation of semantic categories in Alzheimer's disease. Brain and Language, 57, 254-279.