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Major Environment - Renewable Resource Management (63 credits)

Offered by: McGill School of Environment     Degree: Bachelor of Science (Agricultural and Environmental Sciences)

Program Requirements

This domain (63 credits including core) is open only to students in the B.Sc.(Ag.Env.Sc.) Major in Environment or B.Sc. Major in Environment program.

Renewable resource management is an emerging field that focuses on the ecosystem structures and processes required to sustain the delivery, to humanity, of ecosystem goods and services such as food, clean water and air, essential nutrients, and the provision of beauty and inspiration. Renewable resource management recognizes humans as integral components of ecosystems and is used to develop goals that are consistent with sustainability and ecosystem maintenance.

The Renewable Resource Management domain provides students with an understanding of: 1) the interactions between physical and biological factors that determine the nature and dynamics of populations and entities in the natural environment; 2) the ways in which ecosystems can be managed to meet specific goals for the provision of goods and services; 3) the economic and social factors that determine how ecosystems are managed; 4) the ways in which management of natural resources can affect the capability of natural ecosystems to continue to supply human needs in perpetuity; and 5) the approaches and technologies required to monitor and analyze the dynamics of natural and managed ecosystems.

Program Prerequisites or Corequisites

All students in this program MUST take the following pre- or corequisite courses:

One of the following biology courses or CEGEP equivalent (e.g., CEGEP objective 00XU):

  • BIOL 112 Cell and Molecular Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The cell: ultrastructure, division, chemical constituents and reactions. Bioenergetics: photosynthesis and respiration. Principles of genetics, the molecular basis of inheritance and biotechnology.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Joseph Alan Dent, Frieder Schöck (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 2 hours lecture and 3.5 hours laboratory/seminar
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking CEGEP objective 00XU or equivalent; or BIOL 115; or AEBI 122
    • Attendance at first lab is mandatory to confirm registration in the course.
  • LSCI 211 Biochemistry 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Life Sciences : Biochemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids; enzymes and coenzymes. Introduction to intermediary metabolism.

    Terms: Fall 2013, Winter 2014

    Instructors: Armando Jardim, Elias Georges, Timothy Geary (Fall) Armando Jardim, Elias Georges, Reza Salavati (Winter)

    • Co-requisite: FDSC 230
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken FDSC 211

One of the following chemistry courses or CEGEP equivalent (e.g., CEGEP objective 00XV):

  • CHEM 212 Introductory Organic Chemistry 1 (4 credits)

    Offered by: Chemistry (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Chemistry : A survey of reactions of aliphatic and aromatic compounds including modern concepts of bonding, mechanisms, conformational analysis, and stereochemistry.

    Terms: Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Summer 2014

    Instructors: Youla S Tsantrizos, Laura Pavelka, Michel Daoust, Jean-Marc Gauthier, Mitchell Huot (Fall) Michel Daoust, Mitchell Huot, Laura Pavelka, Jean-Philip Lumb, Jean-Marc Gauthier (Winter) Laura Pavelka, Michel Daoust, Mitchell Huot (Summer)

    • Fall, Winter, Summer
    • Prerequisite: CHEM 110 or equivalent.
    • Corequisite: CHEM 120 or equivalent.
    • Restriction: Not open to students who are taking or have taken CHEM 211 or equivalent
    • Each lab section is limited enrolment
    • Note: Some CEGEP programs provide equivalency for this course. For more information, please see the Department of Chemistry's Web page (http://www.chemistry.mcgill.ca/advising/outside/equivalent.htm).
  • FDSC 230 Organic Chemistry (4 credits)

    Offered by: Food Science & Agr-Chemistry (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Food Science : Atomic and molecular structure, modern concepts of bonding, overview of functional groups, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, mechanisms and reactions of aliphatic compounds.

    Terms: Fall 2013, Winter 2014

    Instructors: Varoujan Yaylayan (Fall) Alice Cherestes (Winter)

    • Fall or Winter
    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

Suggested First Year (U1) Courses

For suggestions on courses to take in your first year (U1), you can consult the "MSE Student Handbook 2013-2014" available on the MSE website (http://www.mcgill.ca/mse), or contact Ms. Kathy Roulet, the Program Adviser (kathy [dot] roulet [at] mcgill [dot] ca).

Program Requirements

Note: Students are required to take a maximum of 30 credits at the 200 level and a minimum of 12 credits at the 400 level or higher in this program. This includes core and required courses, but does not include the domain prerequisites or corequisites listed above.

Location Note: When planning their schedule and registering for courses, students should verify where each course is offered because courses for this program are taught at both McGill's Downtown campus and at the Macdonald campus in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue.

Core: Required Courses (18 credits)

Location Note: Core required courses for this program are taught at both McGill's Downtown campus and at the Macdonald campus in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue. You should register in Section 001 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the Downtown campus, and in Section 051 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the Macdonald campus.

  • ENVR 200 The Global Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : A systems approach to study the different components of the environment involved in global climate change: the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. The interactions among these components. Their role in global climate change. The human dimension to global change.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Jeanine Rhemtulla, Nigel Thomas Roulet, Eyad Hashem Atallah, George McCourt, James W Fyles (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Section 001: Downtown Campus
    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus
  • ENVR 201 Society, Environment and Sustainability (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : This course deals with how scientific-technological, socio-economic, political-institutional and behavioural factors mediate society-environment interactions. Issues discussed include population and resources; consumption, impacts and institutions; integrating environmental values in societal decision-making; and the challenges associated with, and strategies for, promoting sustainability. Case studies in various sectors and contexts are used.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Madhav Govind Badami, Nicolas Kosoy (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Section 001: Downtown Campus
    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus
  • ENVR 202 The Evolving Earth (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Formation of the Earth and the evolution of life. How geological and biological change are the consequence of history, chance, and necessity acting over different scales of space and time. General principles governing the formation of modern landscapes and biotas. Effects of human activities on natural systems.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Brian Leung, Martin J Lechowicz, Jeanne Paquette, George McCourt, Terry A Wheeler (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Section 001: Downtown Campus
    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus
  • ENVR 203 Knowledge, Ethics and Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Introduction to cultural perspectives on the environment: the influence of culture and cognition on perceptions of the natural world; conflicts in orders of knowledge (models, taxonomies, paradigms, theories, cosmologies), ethics (moral values, frameworks, dilemmas), and law (formal and customary, rights and obligations) regarding political dimensions of critical environments, resource use, and technologies.

    Terms: Fall 2013, Winter 2014

    Instructors: David Goodin, Julia Freeman (Fall) Jaye Dana Ellis (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown
    • Section 001: Downtown Campus
    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus
  • ENVR 301 Environmental Research Design (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Techniques used in design and completion of environmental research projects. Problem definition, data sources and use of appropriate strategies and methodologies. Principles underlying research design are emphasized, including critical thinking, recognizing causal relationships, ideologies and bias in research, and when and where to seek expertise.

    Terms: Fall 2013, Winter 2014

    Instructors: Ismael Vaccaro, Raja Sengupta, Christopher Barrington-Leigh (Fall) Jeffrey Cardille, Julia Freeman (Winter)

    • Fall-Downtown Campus: Section 001
    • Winter-Downtown Campus: Section 001; Macdonald Campus: Section 051
    • Restrictions: Restricted to U2 or higher
  • ENVR 400 Environmental Thought (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in interdisciplinary seminar groups on challenging philosophical, ethical, scientific and practical issues. They will explore cutting-edge ideas and grapple with the reconciliation of environmental imperatives and social, political and economic pragmatics. Activities include meeting practitioners, attending guest lectures, following directed readings, and organizing, leading and participating in seminars.

    Terms: Fall 2013, Winter 2014

    Instructors: Peter Gilbert Brown, Nicolas Kosoy (Fall) David Goodin, Holly Dressel, Stephanie Posthumus, Kevin Manaugh (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown
    • Section 001: Downtown Campus
    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus
    • Prerequisite: ENVR 203
    • Restriction: Open only to U3 students, or permission of instructor

Core: Complementary Course - Senior Research Project (3 credits)

Only 3 credits will be applied to the program; extra credits will count as electives.

  • AGRI 519 Sustainable Development Plans (6 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Geared for solving real-world environmental problems related to water at the local, regional and international scale in Barbados. Projects to be designed by instructors in consultation with university, government and NGO partners and to be conducted by teams of 2 to 4 students in collaboration with them.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Inteaz Alli, Susan Mahon (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 519 or URBP 519.
  • ENVR 401 Environmental Research (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in an interdisciplinary team on a real-world research project involving problem definition, methodology development, social, ethical and environmental impact assessment, execution of the study, and dissemination of results to the research community and to the people affected. Teams begin defining their projects during the preceding spring.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Anthony Ricciardi (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisite: ENVR 301
    • Restriction: B.A. Faculty Program in Environment, B.A.&Sc. Faculty Program in Environment , B.Sc.(Ag.Env.Sc.) and B.Sc. Major in Environment, and Diploma in Environment.
  • ENVR 451 Research in Panama (6 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Research projects will be developed by instructors in consultation with Panamanian universities, government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Project groups will consist of four to six students working with a Panamanian institution. Topics will be relevant to Panama: e.g., protection of the Canal watershed, economical alternatives to deforestation, etc.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Ana Spalding, Catherine Potvin (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Restriction: students in the Panama Field Semester program. Offered in Panama only

Domain: Complementary Courses (42 credits)

42 credits of complementary courses are selected as follows:

9 credits - Basic Principles of Ecosystem Processes and Diversity
6 credits - 3 credits from each category of Statistics and GIS
6 credits - Advanced Ecosystem Components
6 credits - Advanced Ecological Processes
6 credits - Social Processes
9 credits - Ecosystem Components or Management of Ecosystems

Basic Principles of Ecosystem Processes:

9 credits of basic principles of ecosystem processes and diversity are selected as follows:

One of:

  • AEBI 210 Organisms 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : The biology of plants and plant-based systems in managed and natural terrestrial environments. The interactions between autotrophs and soil organisms and selected groups of animals with close ecological and evolutionary connections with plants (e.g., herbivores and pollinators) will be explored in lecture and laboratory.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Jaswinder Singh (Fall)

    • Restriction(s): Not open to students who have taken PLNT 201 or PLNT 211
    • 2 hour lecture and 3 hour lab
  • AEBI 211 Organisms 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : Introduction to the biology, physiology, structure and function of heterotrophs and their interactions with other organisms. This course will focus on animals in terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments. Topics include bioenergetics and functional metabolism, adaptations to environments, animal-animal, animal-plant, and animal-pathogen interactions.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: David James Lewis (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 200
  • BIOL 305 Animal Diversity (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The characteristics of the major groups of animals, their ancestry, history and relationship to one another. The processes of speciation, adaptive radiation and extinction responsible for diversity. Methods for constructing of phylogenies, for comparing phenotypes, and for estimating and analyzing diversity.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Virginie Millien, Hans Carl Larsson, Graham Bell (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 2 hours lecture and 1 three-hour laboratory
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 215 or both ENVR 200 and ENVR 202

One of:

  • BIOL 308 Ecological Dynamics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Principles of population, community, and ecosystem dynamics: population growth and regulation, species interactions, dynamics of competitive interactions and of predator/prey systems; evolutionary dynamics.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Gregor Fussmann, Frederic Guichard (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours lecture, 1 hour computer lab/tutorial
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 215 or both ENVR 200 and ENVR 202
  • ENVB 305 Population & Community Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Interactions between organisms and their environment; historical and current perspectives in applied and theoretical population and community ecology. Principles of population dynamics, feedback loops, and population regulation. Development and structure of communities; competition, predation and food web dynamics. Biodiversity science in theory and practice.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Crystal Ernst (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 205

One of:

  • ENVB 210 The Biophysical Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : With reference to the ecosystems in the St Lawrence lowlands, the principles and processes governing climate-landform-water-soil-vegetation systems and their interactions will be examined in lecture and laboratory. Emphasis on the natural environment as an integrated system.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken SOIL 210
  • GEOG 305 Soils and Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Discussion of the major properties of soils; soil formation, classification and mapping; land capability assessment; the role and response of soils in natural and disturbed environments (e.g. global change, ecosystem disturbance).

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Timothy R Moore (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours and laboratory
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or introductory course in biology or geology

Statistics

One of:

  • AEMA 310 Statistical Methods 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Mathematics (Agric&Envir Sci) : Measures of central tendency and dispersion; binomial and Poisson distributions; normal, chi-square, Student's t and Fisher-Snedecor F distributions; estimation and hypothesis testing; simple linear regression and correlation; analysis of variance for simple experimental designs.

    Terms: Fall 2013, Winter 2014

    Instructors: Pierre R L Dutilleul, Valérie Gravel (Fall) Pierre R L Dutilleul, Valérie Gravel (Winter)

    • Two 1.5-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab
  • BIOL 373 Biometry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Elementary statistical methods in biology. Introduction to the analysis of biological data with emphasis on the assumptions behind statistical tests and models. Use of statistical techniques typically available on computer packages.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Brian Leung (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 2 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory
    • Prerequisite: MATH 112 or equivalent
    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

GIS Methods

One of:

  • ENVB 430 GIS for Natural Resource Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis techniques to the presentation and analysis of ecological information, including sources and capture of spatial data; characterizing, transforming, displaying spatial data; and spatial analysis to solve resource management problems.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Jeffrey Cardille (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisites: At least one environmental science course and one ecology course or permission of instructor
    • Restrictions: U2 students and above. Not open to students who have taken GEOG 201, 306 or 307 or BREE/ABEN 430 or NRSC 430. Limited to 32 students.
  • GEOG 201 Introductory Geo-Information Science (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An introduction to Geographic Information Systems. The systematic management of spatial data. The use and construction of maps. The use of microcomputers and software for mapping and statistical work. Air photo and topographic map analyses.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Margaret Kalacska, Raja Sengupta (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours and lab

Advanced Ecosystem Components:

6 credits of advanced ecosystem components selected from:

  • BIOL 553 Neotropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Ecology revisited in view of tropical conditions. Exploring species richness. Sampling and measuring biodiversity. Conservation status of ecosystems, communities and species. Indigenous knowledge.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Catherine Potvin (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 24 hours lecture and 36 hours field work over a 4-week period
    • Prerequisites: HISP 218, MATH 203, and BIOL 215
    • Corequisites: ENVR 451; GEOG 404 and HIST 510 alternating with GEOG 498 and AGRI 550
    • Restriction: location in Panama. Students must register for a full semester of studies in Panama
  • GEOG 372 Running Water Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The course focuses on the physical habitat conditions found in streams, rivers, estuaries and deltas. Based on the laws governing flow of water and sediment transport, it emphasizes differences among these environments, in terms of channel form, flow patterns, substrate composition and mode of evolution. Flooding, damming, channelisation, forestry impacts.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Michel F Lapointe (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisites: GEOG 203 and GEOG 272, or ENVR 200 and ENVR 202
  • PLNT 358 Flowering Plant Diversity (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Principles of classification and identification of flowering plants and ferns, with emphasis on 35 major families of flowering plants and the habitats in which they grow.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Marcia J Waterway (Fall)

    • 2 lectures, one 3-hour lab, plus a 4-day field week held the week preceding the start of classes
    • Prerequisite: PLNT 201 or AEBI 210 or ENVR 202 or permission of instructor
    • A $51.30 fee is charged to all students registered in this course, which has a fieldwork component prior to the beginning of classes in August. This fee is used to support the cost of excursions, a hand lens, instructional handouts and identification aids. Students who have already received a hand lens may request a reimbursement of a portion of this charge through their department.
  • SOIL 326 Soils in a Changing Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Soil Science : Soil processes responsible for soil formation will be studied and the impact of changes to the physical and chemical environment will be discussed.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: William H Hendershot (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisite: A previous course in soil science, geography, geology or permission of instructor.
  • WILD 307 Natural History of Vertebrates (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Review of higher taxonomic groups of vertebrates and prochordates, emphasizing diagnostic characters evolution and distribution.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Murray Mitchell Humphries (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Lectures and modules
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ZOOL 307
    • This course carries an additional charge of $15.39 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.

Advanced Ecological Processes:

6 credits of advanced ecological processes selected from:

* Note: You may take BIOL 432 or ENVB 315, but not both; you can take BREE 217 or GEOG 322, but not both.

  • BIOL 432 Limnology (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : A study of the physical, chemical and biological properties of lakes and other inland waters, with emphasis on their functioning as systems.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Irene Gregory-Eaves, Gregor Fussmann (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 2 hours lecture; 2 weekends at field station equivalent to 3 hours laboratory per week
    • Prerequisites: BIOL 206 and BIOL 215 or permission of instructor.
    • This course, involving two field weekends, has an additional fee of $230.85, which includes room and board and transportation. The fee is refundable during the period where a student can drop the course with full refund. The Department of Biology subsidizes a portion of the cost for this activity.
    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ENVB 315.
  • BIOL 465 Conservation Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Discussion of relevant theoretical and applied issues in conservation biology. Topics: biodiversity, population viability analysis, community dynamics, biology of rarity, extinction, habitat fragmentation, social issues.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: David M Green, Heather Gray, Andrew Gonzalez (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 hours lecture
    • Prerequisite: BIOL 215 OR both ENVR 200 and ENVR 202
  • BREE 217 Hydrology and Water Resources (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : Measurements and analysis of components of the water cycle. Precipitation, evaporation, infiltration and groundwater. Analysis of hydrologic data. Hydrograph theory. Hydrologic estimations for design of water control projects; flood control and reservoir routing. Integrated watershed management and water conservation. Water management systems for environmental protection.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Zhiming Qi (Winter)

    • 3 lectures, one 2-hour lab
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ABEN 217.
    • Note: This course carries an additional course charge of $30 to cover transportation costs for two field trips, which may include a visit to a national weather station and a trip to gain hands-on experience on monitoring water flow in streams.
  • ENVB 315 Science of Inland Waters (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Nature and history of limnology; divisions of inland waters; properties of fresh water; habitats; zones; nutrient cycles; biota; adaptations; seasonal variation; distributions; pollution; succession and evolution of fresh water environments. Includes field excursions.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: David James Lewis (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken NRSC 315.
  • ENVB 410 Ecosystem Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Biotic and abiotic processes that control the flows of energy, nutrients and water through ecosystems; emergent system properties; approaches to analyzing complex systems. Labs include collection and multivariate analysis of field data.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: James W Fyles (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisites: ENVB 222, AEMA 310 or permission of instructor
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WOOD 410
    • This course has an additional charge of $15.39 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.
  • GEOG 322 Environmental Hydrology (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Quantitative, experimental study of the principles governing the movement of water at or near the Earth's surface and how the research relates to the chemistry and biology of ecosystems.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Nigel Thomas Roulet, Bernhard Lehner (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or equivalent
  • MICR 331 Microbial Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Microbiology (Agric&Envir Sc) : The ecology of microorganisms, primarily bacteria and archaea, and their roles in biogeochemical cycles will be discussed. Microbial interactions with the environment, plants, animals and other microbes emphasizing the underlying genetics and physiology. Diversity, evolution (microbial phylogenetics) and the application of molecular biology in microbial ecology.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Brian T Driscoll (Winter)

    • Winter
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have successfully completed NRSC 331
  • NRSC 333 Pollution and Bioremediation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : The environmental contaminants which cause pollution; sources, amounts and transport of pollutants in water, air and soil; waste management.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Lyle Whyte, William H Hendershot (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures
    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 333
  • PLNT 460 Plant Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Theory and practice of plant ecology with an emphasis on the interaction between patterns and ecological processes and the dynamics, conservation and management of plant populations and communities over a range of temporal and spatial scales.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Sylvie de Blois (Fall)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisite: AEMA 310 or permission of instructor.
    • This course carries an additional charge of $25.65 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.

Social Processes:

6 credits of social processes selected as follows:

* If WILD 415 is taken, 1 additional credit of complementary courses must be taken.

** Note: You may take AGEC 333 and ECON 405, but not both.

  • AGEC 242 Management Theories and Practices (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : An introduction to contemporary management theories and practices in organizations of the food sector.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Brahm Canzer (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures
  • AGEC 333 Resource Economics (3 credits) **

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The role of resources in the environment, use of resources, and management of economic resources within the firm or organization. Problem-solving, case studies involving private and public decision-making in organizations are utilized.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Paul Thomassin (Fall)

    • Fall
    • Prerequisites: AGEC 200 or equivalent
  • ANTH 339 Ecological Anthropology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Intensive study of theories and cases in ecological anthropology. Theories are examined and tested through comparative case-study analysis. Cultural constructions of "nature" and "environment" are compared and analyzed. Systems of resource management and conflicts over the use of resources are studied in depth.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    • Winter
    • Prerequisite: ANTH 204, or ANTH 206, or SOCI 328, or GEOG 300 or ENVR 201, or ENVR 203, or permission of instructor
  • CANS 407 Regions of Canada (3 credits)

    Offered by: Institute for Study of Canada (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Canadian Studies : Canadian regionalism and its manifestations in literature and the media, as well as in social and public policy, focusing on one region in Canada.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: CANS 200 or permission of instructor
  • ECON 405 Natural Resource Economics (3 credits) **

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Topics include: Malthusian and Ricardian Scarcity; optimal depletion of renewable and non-renewable resources; exploration, risk and industry structure, and current resources, rent and taxation. Current public policies applied to the resource industries, particularly those of a regulatory nature.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Robert D Cairns (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: ECON 230 or ECON 250
  • GEOG 382 Principles Earth Citizenship (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Foundations and applications of earth citizenship. Foundations: sustainability, tragedy of the commons, dominion, privatization and public welfare, resilience, precautionary principle, and land ethic are critically considered. Applications: implications for relationship between human and natural economies; human population size and control; and morality of modern agricultural and forestry practices.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    • Winter
    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken or are taking NRSC 374. Restricted to U2 or U3 students. Enrolment limited to 50.
  • GEOG 498 Humans in Tropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Focus on understanding of inter-relations between humans and neotropical environments represented in Panama. Study of contemporary rural landscapes, their origins, development and change. Impacts of economic growth and inequality, social organization, and politics on natural resource use and environmental degradation. Site visits and field exercises in peasant/colonist, Amerindian, and plantation communities.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Daviken Studnicki-Gizbert (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 6 hours lecture for 4 weeks, 3 hours seminar, 2 hours laboratory, 8 hours conference
    • Restriction: Location in Panama. Student must register for a full semester of studies in Panama
    • Prerequisites: HISP 218, MATH 203 or equivalents
  • RELG 270 Religious Ethics and the Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Religious Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Religious Studies : Environmental potential of various religious traditions and secular perspectives, including animal rights, ecofeminism, and deep ecology.

    Terms: Fall 2013, Winter 2014

    Instructors: Eliza Rosenberg (Fall) Eliza Rosenberg (Winter)

    • Fall: Macdonald Campus (Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue). Winter: Downtown Campus.
  • SOCI 565 Social Change in Panama (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Analysis of social change in Panama, particularly during the 20th century: demography, social and economic structures, rural and urban activities and landscapes, indigenous peoples, the effects of the Canal and the Free Trade Zone. Focus throughout on the interaction of human society and the environment.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    • Prerequisites: SOCI 210 and SOCI 350 or equivalents.
    • Restriction: Students must register for a full term in the Panama Field Studies Semester.
    • Note: Four field trips.
  • URBP 520 Globalization: Planning and Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : Economic and social issues related to planning for sustainable development, with a focus on water. Political and environmental determinants of resource use. Impact of global, regional and local institutions, programs and plans in Barbados and in the field locale in general.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Leroy E Phillip, Inteaz Alli (Fall)

    • (3-3-3)
    • Restriction: Must be enrolled in the Barbados Field Study Semester.
    • The cost of the program is CDN$6925.50. This amount includes food (Mon to Fri) and all lodging, but does not include airfare
  • WILD 415 Conservation Law (2 credits) *

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : A study of the various federal, provincial and municipal laws affecting wildlife habitat. Topics include: laws to protect wild birds and animals; the regulation of hunting; legal protection of trees and flowers, sanctuaries, reserves, parks; techniques of acquiring and financing desirable land, property owner rights.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    • Fall
    • 2 lectures

Ecosystem Components or Management of Ecosystems:

9 credits of ecosystem components or management of ecosystems selected from:

  • AGRI 435 Soil and Water Quality Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Management of soil and water systems for sustainability. Cause of soil degradation, surface and groundwater contamination by agricultural chemicals and toxic pollutants. Human health and safety concerns. Water-table management. Soil and water conservation techniques will be examined with an emphasis on methods of prediction and best management practices.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Zhiming Qi, Chandra A Madramootoo, Asim Biswas (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • This course carries an additional charge of $13 to cover the cost of transportation with respect to a field trip. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.
  • AGRI 452 Water Resources in Barbados (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Physical environment challenges, centered on water, being faced by an island nation. Guest speakers, field study tours and laboratory tests. Private, government and NGO institutional context of conservation strategies, and water quantity and quality analyses for water management specific to Barbados.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Ronald Gehr, Scott Jasechko (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 452.
  • AGRI 550 Sustained Tropical Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Contrast theory and practice in defining agricultural environmental "challenges" in the Neotropics. Indigenous and appropriate technological means of mitigation. Soil management and erosion, water scarcity, water over-abundance, and water quality. Explore agro-ecosystem protection via field trips and project designs. Institutional context of conservation strategies, NGO links, and public participation.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: HISP 218 or equivalent; MATH 203 or AEMA 310 or equivalent
    • Restriction: Restricted Enrolment. Location in Panama. Student must be registered for a full semester of studies in Panama
  • ENVB 437 Assessing Environmental Impact (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Theories and procedures of assessing environmental impact. An examination of the environmental impact of existing programs and projects to examine their accuracy in predicting consequences and attenuating undesirable effects.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 2 lectures
    • Restrictions: U2 students and above. Not open to students who have taken WILD 437 or NRSC 437.
  • GEOG 302 Environmental Management 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An ecological analysis of the physical and biotic components of natural resource systems. Emphasis on scientific, technological and institutional aspects of environmental management. Study of the use of biological resources and of the impact of individual processes.

    Terms: Fall 2013, Summer 2014

    Instructors: Thomas C Meredith (Fall) Geraldine Akman (Summer)

    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: Any 200-level course in Geography or MSE or BIOL 208 or permission of instructor.
  • GEOG 404 Environmental Management 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Practical application of environmental planning, analysis and management techniques with reference to the needs and problems of developing areas. Special challenges posed by cultural differences and traditional resource systems are discussed. This course involves practical field work in a developing area (Kenya or Panama).

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Thomas C Meredith, Alec Blair, Leigh Brownhill (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 hours
    • Prerequisite: GEOG 302 or permission of instructor
  • PLNT 300 Cropping Systems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Application of plant science and soil science to production of agronomic and horticultural crops. Use and sustainability of fertilization, weed control, crop rotation, tillage, drainage and irrigation practices.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Philippe Seguin, Alan K Watson (Fall)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisite: AEBI 210
  • SOIL 335 Soil Ecology and Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Soil Science : The physical and chemical environment of soil organisms; survey of soil microflora and fauna; processes and optimal agronomic systems of management consistent with the goals of ecological agriculture.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisites: SOIL 210 or ENVB 210
  • WILD 401 Fisheries and Wildlife Management (4 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Principles of fisheries and wildlife management are considered and current practices of research and management are discussed.

    Terms: Fall 2013

    Instructors: Christopher Solomon, Murray Mitchell Humphries (Fall)

    • Fall
    • 3 lectures, one 2-hour lab and one week field laboratory prior to fall term
    • Prerequisite: PLNT 358
    • A $307.80 fee is charged to all students registered in WILD 401, Fisheries and Wildlife Management, a course that has a required field trip. This fee is used to support the cost of excursions, accommodations, food and fees associated with visiting a research facility in New York. The Department of Natural Resource Sciences subsidizes a portion of the cost of this compulsory activity.
  • WOOD 441 Integrated Forest Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Woodland Resources : The study of silviculture and silvics and their application to forest management to sustain the production of wood and other ecological goods and services such as wildlife, water and landscape in natural forests and rural environments (agroforestry). Acquisition of practical skills in forest surveying and computer simulation of forest growth.

    Terms: Winter 2014

    Instructors: Benoit Cote (Winter)

    • Winter
    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab
    • Prerequisite: ENVB 210 or ENVB 222 or ENVB 305 or permission of instructor.
Faculty of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences—2013-2014 (last updated Aug. 21, 2013) (disclaimer)